Tuesday, April 2, 2013

No Need for the Big Guns

Now that we've moved... again... we had to register our new address with the local and national authorities. Our residency cards have our address in Sevilla, which means we need to be issued new cards. We headed over to City Hall last week to see if we could find out what we were supposed to do. San Geraldo couldn't find definitive answers online, but he did find enough to get a general idea.

NOT FAR FROM HOME. PULLED FROM THE SEA WHERE IT SANK DURING A BATTLE IN 1578.
GLAD WE DIDN'T DRAG IT ALONG WITH US.

Remembering Thing 1 and Thing 2 (and even Thing 3) in Sevilla (click here and here for that story), we were prepared (we thought) for anything. What we hadn't expected was a warm greeting, a charming visit, and an easy process. At City Hall, we registered as residents of Fuengirola (and the Province of Málaga).

PLAZA DE ESPAÑA AND THE FRONT OF THE AYUNTAMIENTO (CITY HALL).
THE BACK DOOR (ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE ZOO).

We then had to go to the National Police a few blocks away to update our residency cards. We were given an appointment to return this morning, which went perfectly, and we'll go back in 30 days to pick up our new cards. We were treated well by every staff member as was every other visitor (no matter how annoying, obnoxious, confused, or uncooperative. We, of course, were charming and gracious... and very cooperative.

NATIONAL POLICE. A FRIENDLY PLACE... AS FAR AS WE KNOW.

During this morning's process, the officer at the desk wanted Jerry to place his finger on the scanner so she could get a new print. She didn't speak English and was very shy. Instead of telling Jerry in Spanish to place his index finger on the scanner, which neither of us had noticed (the scanner, that is, not his index finger), she simply held her finger up in the air. Being so very cooperative, as I mentioned in the preceding paragraph, and having absolutely no clue what she was pointing at, San Geraldo laughed and stuck his finger in the air as well. That broke the ice and our once-shy bureaucrat seemed to enjoy the rest of our visit. We have to go back in 30 days to pick up our new cards. So, we're covered until mid-2014 when our residency is up for another two-year renewal.

ANOTHER BIG GUN. AT LEAST WE KNOW WHERE THEY ARE IF WE NEED THEM.
(THE SPANISH ARMADA LOST AN AWFUL LOT OF THEM OFF THE COAST.)

20 comments:

  1. That was easy!! My, what a difference a few miles make! Bet you were both relieved. Love those cannons!!

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    1. Jim:
      Very pleasantly surprised. Sevilla turned out alright in the end, but it was much more confusing. Here, everyone was on the same page.

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  2. Such an interesting life you lead!

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  3. Oh, great! It's so much nicer to go through life interacting with, and being, pleasant people :) Congratulations!

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    1. Judeet:
      Thanks. It definitely does make life more pleasant.

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  4. I recall the nightmare you went through with Spanish bureaucracy in the past. So glad this transition is going smoothly.

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    1. Stephen:
      And this bodes well for our renewals in 2014!

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  5. Goodness me! Boredom must be an emotion you never experience.

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    1. Raybeard:
      Amazingly, I do get bored regularly. Some people...

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  6. Ah splendid - you're legal again. It's a sad thing when your cats have more permanent residency rights than do you!

    I notice from your photographs that all of the scenes seem to be lit by some enormmous light in the sky. What is that exactly and from where may we obtain one?

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    1. Owl Wood:
      Well, our cats are Spanish citizens; we're just temporary (at this point) residents. But our cats are also a bit unbalanced. They both seem to think the government has placed microchips under their skin.

      That bright light is called "sol." I don't think it's available in Great Britain (I've even checked on Amazon.UK.)

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  7. It was not lost on me that City Hall is right across the street from the Zoo... seems appropriate to me. However, your experience here sounds SO much friendlier and easier than in Sevilla. Say... what do you think of eating eels? They were actually quite tasty... not a thing like kangaroo ;-)

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  8. Sharon:
    Eels? Blech! Read my blog post from July 2011 -- http://mitchellismoving.blogspot.com.es/2011/07/nobody-loves-me-everybody-hates-me.html.

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  9. You must have been a bit confused or befuddled at why you had such a difficult time last year and this year ~~~ with a snap of the fingers you are taken care of. Probably the salt air ~~~ it makes people more amiable! Maybe!?

    Ron

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    1. Ron:
      Maybe a combination of the salt air, an expat town, and about 1/10 the population.

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  10. Sounds good! I have some less pleasant memories of doing this in Germany in the early '70s. Actually, they were pleasant to my husband and me, but the visible and audible treatment of some third world folk was not very easy to watch.

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    1. Kristi:
      Ugh. I can only imagine what it was like doing this in the '70s. It was legally less complicated to move from country to country at that time, but bias in treatment was the norm.

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  11. That is such a beautiful spot, and the cannons are really cool. SO old!

    I love the "finger in the air" story.

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    1. Knatolee:
      Should we be worried that the cannons are pointing at North Africa?

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