Saturday, May 23, 2015

Teatro Romano Gets A Thumbs Up

Judy and I spent the afternoon (and well into the evening Thursday) in Málaga. Mostly, we explored the Teatro Romano, the Roman amphitheatre built in the 1st century and re-discovered in 1951 during the building of a Franco-Era cultural centre. Once discovered, an archaeological dig began, but Franco's cultural centre was completed anyway. The Teatro Romana was again used for performances.

In the 1980s, it was decided that the cultural centre was impacting the survival of the theatre (and covering over about half of it) and it was torn down as a symbol of the break with the dictatorship ended less than 10 years earlier. Restoration continued and it was learned that in the 3rd century, after the fall of the Roman empire, the area became a fish-salting plant and then a necropolis. Many of the capitols and columns were used in the construction of the Arab Alcazaba fortress (click here) that was built in the 11th century on the hill overlooking the area.

Whew. That was more history than I intended to share and probably more history than you intended to read. The site is phenomenal. The display in the nearby small information centre was excellent. And it's all free! (Click any image to rebuild the Roman Empire.)

JUDY WANTED ME TO PHOTOSHOP TOGAS ONTO THE TOURISTS.
WHAT JUDY THOUGHT OF MY DECISION TO NOT PUT TOGAS ON TOURISTS.
THE VIEW FROM THE CHEAP SEATS.
SEATS, ORCHESTRA PIT, STAGE.
LOOKING FROM STAGE LEFT UP TO THE LOWER WALLS OF THE ALCAZABA.
THE SURVIVING BARREL-VAULTED ENTRANCE TO THE ORCHESTRA.
(THERE WOULD HAVE BEEN AN IDENTICAL ONE OPPOSITE.)




Arrivederci, Roma (my gift to The Dowager Duchess — Mario Lanza)...

16 comments:

  1. So gorgeous. And I, for one, enjoy the history lessons!

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    1. Bob:
      Thanks for enjoying my history lessons. I take it you didn't major in history!

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  2. History lessons are so very important.

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    1. Ron:
      And I'm so much more open to them than I was when I was actually studying history!

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  3. Love it! I just love cities with so much history smack dab in the middle of them.

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    1. Cheapchick:
      And to think we described our house in San Diego as "old." It was built in 1924.

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  4. I like the high balcony seats. I imagine I could sit there and enjoy a show without having to shout "Down in front! Duck your head!" The Romans got it right. Junior Mints were probably a lot cheaper back then too.

    Thanks for the photos and history, Mitchell.

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    1. Robyn:
      I wonder what Milk Duds were called in Roman times.

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  5. An impressive place - just imagine all that has happened there! And you very entertainingly snuck in a century-spanning history lesson, too. Funny, I don't remember history being as interesting a subject in school ...

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    1. Wilma:
      I hate to just throw so many pictures at you with no explanation. Wish I had done this kind of travel when I was 10. I might have studied my history more.

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  6. When looking at Roman ruins it is at times hard to get your head around just how long ago they built. Great that the ruins are now fully exposed.

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    1. Andrew:
      It's really hard to build here in Spain without making some major discovery.

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  7. Take me to the vomitorium. Ruins are fun. Unless you live in one.

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    1. Walt the Fourth:
      We're trying to upgrade our little ruin. It was built in1973 and we need to bring some of it up to the standards of the Teatro Romano.

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  8. Feel like I'm there with you... great photos! Maybe some day we'll get back to Spain and see more... lots more!

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    1. Sharon:
      In the meantime, we'll keep exploring for you.

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