Saturday, September 12, 2015

Fluent, Fluency, Affluent, Influenza?

My first month in New York, I practiced my Spanish daily with Duolingo. But times became too stressful to even do that. I managed to converse in Spanish at times with hospital staff, but that wasn't enough to improve my skills (although it did impress My Mother The Dowager Duchess).

But, I'm back in Spain and back to working on my Spanish proficiency. Interestingly, the break seems to have done me some good. I'm quickly back up to speed and I'm more readily absorbing new words and verb forms.

Speaking of proficiency, last night San Geraldo said something in English that wasn't quite correct. (A regular occurrence.)

He then said something in Spanish that wasn't quite correct. (Another regular occurrence.)

Then he said a Spanish word and asked if it was Spanish or Russian (his undergrad degree was in Russian Studies). In can sometimes confuse him. For example: In Spanish, "ya" is "already" and "yo" is "I"; in Russian, "ya" is "I." So, yeah... yah... yes, I understand the problem.

Anyway, I could answer for the Spanish, but I had no idea about the Russian.

DUDO DOESN'T UNDERSTAND EITHER.
AND MOOSE CAN'T BE BOTHERED.

San Geraldo commented that he obviously needs to work on his "fluenticity."

Yes, he does.

At least as soon as the word left his lips, he smiled and said, "Ooh, that's not a word, is it."

I smiled and responded, "Maybe in Russian?"


This song seemed appropriate.  Language, it's a virus...

25 comments:

  1. Dudo and Moose say "It's all Greek to me!" We don't even speak any other languages (hubby understands a little Ukrainian but can't speak it except a few phrases that can't be typed here) and we do that too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheapchick:
      San Geraldo is now semi-fluent in multiple languages.

      Delete
  2. I still have trouble with my native English, so other foreign languages are a real challenge, I still remember some German words and phrases from grandparents.

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    Replies
    1. Linda:
      After 9 weeks in New York, I started muddling every language. But I'm never as [unintentionally] creative as San Geraldo.

      Delete
  3. I adore your San Geraldo. :)

    (p.s. I am thrilled to see the sweet and fluffy Moose and Dudo again, in the flesh... euuh... fur. )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Judy:
      I adore my San Geraldo, too! And Moose and Dudo, who just switched off. Dudo is blessing San Geraldo with his company, while Moose has joined me. So kind.

      Delete
  4. I love that word! And have no doubt about its meaning. It's quite authentate.

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    Replies
    1. Sharon:
      I've got so many more to share. We've even got our Spanish friends saying some Spanish words a la Jerry!

      Delete
  5. I love to explore the etymology of words; you can stumble across some interesting and illuminating tidbits. "Confluence" and "confusion" come to mind as appropriate for this post. ;-)

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    Replies
    1. Wilma:
      I quite often look up a word's origin. I find it fascinating. I immediately share the history with everyone. And then it quickly leaves my mind!

      Delete
  6. Fluenticity?
    I's say it's a word now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob:
      If San Geraldo says it, it becomes a word. Sometimes I enjoy his screw-ups so much that I can't remember the correct words.

      Delete
  7. Oh so good to hear things are getting back to normal!
    I think I'll stick to english.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim:
      Sadly, that IS San Geraldo sticking to English.

      Delete
  8. I'm impressed by anyone who speaks more than one language, or even tried to learn another.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stephen:
      I LOVE languages and wish I had been immersed in multiple languages when I was a kid. Still, never too late to learn.

      Delete
  9. In French, it would be "fluenticitude." You're welcome.

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    Replies
    1. Walt the Fourth:
      I won't tell San Geraldo. He'll believe you and will try and use it in the French cafe downstairs! You should hear him say mon die (sounds like moan do).

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Gosia:
      We missed them so much! They are so affectionate... and entertaining.

      Delete
  11. With smoochy little pussies like that who needs words? (Aaaaaaah!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ray:
      You can appreciate how good it feels to cuddle with them again. We really missed them and it became painful as time passed. So grateful they were loved and taken care of. They weren't traumatised by our absence, but clearly missed us.

      Delete
  12. Mitch, my pussies dominate my mind whether I'm away for a week or just for half an hour. There's no mental 'escape' from their clutches.

    ReplyDelete
  13. wish me luck; Someone and I are about to start Spanish lessons - he is doing a European version and I am Latin Spanish. que rico.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spo:
      That makes me think of Rico Suave, so I just looked him up. Oh well. Should have stuck with my memories. Oh, jeez!

      Delete

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