Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Being Fruitful

San Geraldo made his daily stop at Ana Crespillo's fruit market here in Los Boliches (click for the Facebook page) and she had him try two new-to-him fruits. He liked them so much that he bought two of each so I could share in the ecstasy.

Mangostán
The first is called Mangostán. I've looked it up and learned the English name is Purple Mangosteen. It's a tropical evergreen tree. The fruit I tasted had a subtle fragrance and a mild, pleasant, and very slightly tart flavor. It's got little nutritional value, but that's not the only reason I eat.

[Postscript: Although there is no scientific evidence that Mangostán has nutritional value, there have been no studies done on the fresh fruit — only canned fruit or juice. It is reputed to have quite a number of benefits.]

MANGOSTÁN (PURPLE MANGOSTEEN).
ABOUT THE SIZE OF A TANGERINE.
ONLY THE WHITE PART OF THE FRUIT IS EDIBLE.

Granadilla
The second fruit is called granadilla. Native to the Andes Mountains, it's known as grenadia or passion fruit in other parts of the world.

Pictured below in San Geraldo's unusually large hand (he's got two of them and they are well-balanced by his unusually large feet), it looks much smaller than it is. I added a photo at the bottom of a granadilla alongside a plum-sized mangostán, so you can see the difference.

When the granadilla is sliced open, there's a gelatinous pulp surrounding the seeds. You simply pour that into your mouth. It looks like mucous and it tastes like nectar from the Gods. Sweet and smooth. And containing Vitamins A, C, and K, phosphorous, iron, and calcium. I could develop a passion for it.

GRANADILLA.
I WAS SUPRISED BY THE PERFECT FLAVOUR AND TEXTURE.
IT EVEN HAS BUILT-IN PADDING TO PROTECT THE SEEDS.

29 comments:

  1. I/we know that you were holding back here!....for decency sake! lol
    Neither looks too appealing to me. But I guess I would try them....maybe once.
    Texture is of prime importance to me when eating......these just don't do it for me.
    But, I am very happy you liked them.

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    1. Jim:
      Two posts in a row that required me to (try at least) to be completely mature. Texture is very important to me, too. The texture of the mangosteen was surprisingly not at all how it looked.

      Delete
  2. I am game for anything new, unlike Mr. J C who gets mighty squirmy around gelatinous fruits! Then again, maybe I'm not. Please help me!

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    1. Ron:
      I at first thought, "There's no way I'm putting THAT in my mouth!" But the texture was nothing like it looked and the taste was exquisite!

      Delete
  3. Thanks for exposing me to fruits I've never even heard of.

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    1. Stephen:
      You can count on me to expose you to fruits!

      Delete
  4. The flavour of passion fruit is so distinctive and delicious. In Hawaii the golden ones are called Lilikoi and are used in everything (desserts, cocktails, preserves, juice, flavouring for tea). They are always a treat when we travel there.

    Aren't mangosteens supposed to have some "amazing" health benefits? I need to get on the google.

    Cheers (from Canada)
    Trevor

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    1. Trevor:
      You're right that mangosteens are reputed to have some, yes, "amazing" health benefits. I just respond to Heron's comment that I should have been more specific. There's no scientific evidence but the only research that's been done has been on the canned fruit and the juice. Many people believe in the value of the fruit. And they could very well be right. I had had passion fruit treats in Hawaii, but I never had the fresh fruit. Wow!

      Delete
  5. Mangosteens are said to be good for the libido, and improved performance and stamina in men and women.

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    1. Heron:
      I'll make a note in the post. I should have been more clear. There's no scientific evidence that they have much nutritional value, but the only research done has been on the canned fruit and the juice. Who knows what they might find if they tested the fresh fruit. Many people believe strongly in its benefits. Anyway, it's worth the chance isn't it?!?

      Delete
    2. Nothing ventured, nothing gained :)

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  6. We have passion fruits in Belize and they are wonderful. I make juice from them by spooning out the inside into a blender and whizzing it gently. The seeds stay intact and can be strained off. The juice is so strong that I usually dilute it 1 part juice to 3 parts water. It goes well mixed with champagne, vodka, or gin.
    I have never had a mangosteen, but had imagined them to be much bigger! A friend tells me they are her all time favorite fruit. Perhaps Heron has some insight into that!

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    1. Wilma:
      Many people think Mangosteens have lots of value (nutritional and otherwise), but no research has been done except on the canned fruit and the juice (which showed nothing). I probably should have made that more clear. Your juice sounds really good -- especially with vodka, gin, or champagne. However, you do realize you just told me to COOK something!

      Delete
    2. Maybe SG can do the cooking. I hear he has a way with fruits ...

      Delete
    3. Wilma:
      Yes, San Geraldo has years of experience with fruits. I'll mention it.

      Delete
  7. I've heard of both but not tried either; yet. You know my peculiar and unabashadly juvenile sense of humour is doing a crazy tap dance after reading these posts, yes?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Cranky, I can just imagine where that little mind of yours has gone!

      Delete
  8. I have never eaten them look delicious

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  9. I have never seen Mangostán before, but it seems like an awful lot of work for very little reward and I am so lazy that, well, I'll just have an apple.
    As for the granadilla, you lost me at mucus.

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    1. Bob:
      There really was no work. Jerry cut it in half and you can then eat it with your fingers or use a spoon. The "innards" pop out easily. i'm kind of finicky, so I figure if I could get past the appearance of the granadilla, you can. It was surprising pleasant in the mouth -- not at all like mucous.

      Delete
  10. I can't decide if those fruit are beautiful or creepy looking, so I'll go with both.
    Hugs across the miles to you, Mitchell.

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    1. Robyn:
      I forgot to mention that you can shake the granadilla like a maraca (before you cut it open). I'll bet you'd enjoy that!

      Delete
  11. Eating a Mangosteen is on my bucket list.

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    1. Spo:
      Just do it or that's going to be a very long bucket list.

      Delete
  12. I need to find and try granadilla!!!! I'm glad to hear that it was tasty!

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    1. Brittany:
      SO good... and pricey. But SO worth it.

      Delete
  13. Yummy yummy! I've had mangosteens on our travels and occasionally they show up in supermarkets here.

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    1. Knatolee:
      We (Jerry) tended to not buy things we knew nothing about. But with Ana Crespillo's market, she encourages us to try things and tells us what's good and for what use. I had had things made with passion fruit, but never the fresh fruit. Wow! We've got one of each in the house again today.

      Delete

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