Thursday, June 16, 2016

Say My Name, Abrevaduci?

Andalusians often drop consonants, especially "d" and "s" (and n) when they appear mid-word or at the end of a word, which means Andalusians drop a lot of consonants. They also regularly drop vowels, which often doesn't leave much "word."

Buenos días (good day) sounds something like "buen dia." Our neighborhood, Los Boliches, is more like Lo Bo-LEESCHeh (and to an untrained ear even sounds like Lo Bo-LEE). The city of Cádiz (which should sound kind of like CAH-deeth) sounds more like CAH-ee. Consonants are dropped. Letters are changed. Sometimes, entire words disappear. I'm oversimplifying, but you get the idea. 

Our ears have adjusted in these five years. San Geraldo, whose Spanish is already quite "interesting" has even begun to speak Andalusian. Buena NO-shay, he says, instead of Buenas Noches when he goes to bed at night.

One of our friends has his own creative way of speaking both Spanish and English (different from San Geraldo's creative way).

This all leads me to the challenge of expressing a desire to go to Abrevaero, a great little tapas bar and restaurant just a few minutes from home (we've got just about everything within a few minutes of home).

Abrevaero, although the actual name of the restaurant, isn't even a word. It's the way a local would pronounce the Spanish word "abrevadero," which translates to "drinking trough" (a place to water the horses and get refreshed).

San Geraldo has called it Abrevaduci, Arevada, and I can't remember what else. Our local friend (who shall remain nameless) calls it something like Arivadabra, or maybe it's Abradaba... or Abree-air-a I'm not quite sure. At least it doesn't stop us from enjoying the food, service, and atmosphere.

(Click the images, taken during two different visits, and maybe you'll remember the name.)

ALCOCHOFA (ARTICHOKE) WITH TUNA, CRAB MEAT, KIWI, ETC.)
TRADITIONAL SPANISH TORTILLA.
THEIR VERSION IS MOIST, EGGY, AND DELICIOUS.
TORTILLA RELLENA (A STUFFED SPANISH TORTILLA).
CHORIZO.
SETAS Y JAMON (MUSHROOMS AND HAM).
TERNERA (BEEF).
ABREVAERO'S INTERPRETATION OF TIRAMISU.

Maybe we should just call it "Abracadabra." It's magic.

23 comments:

  1. Great looking food:)
    Ha-eey biray today, Mitchell:) (said with my best imagined Andalusian accent:)

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  2. Yes, a Happy Birthday to you Mitch!
    Oh learning another language can be so entertaining!! We live in a bilingual country, English and French, and let's put it this way...I am happy I do not live in Quebec where it is mostly French. Bravo to you both for learning Spanish seemingly so easily.

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    1. Jim:
      Oh, my Spanish is still often simplistic and warped, but I can get along just fine now. I love it!

      Delete
  3. That food all looks great. Tapas bars were a favorite when we were in Dpain.

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    1. Stephen:
      It really is the perfect kind of meal for me and can be a lot cheaper than a traditional order.

      Delete
  4. (steals the chorizo and tiramisu when you look the other way)

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    1. anne marie:
      Oh, I'd share... Well, maybe not the tiramisu...

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  5. However you say it, it looks dee-lish!

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    1. Bob:
      That would be day-lee-thee-OH-so... or some variation.

      Delete
  6. Happy Birthday! Going out to dinner to celebrate? Every one of those dishes looks lovely and oh, so tasty! I've noticed when we're in Lo de Marcos (Nayarit) that people pronounce Buenos Dias differently... dropping various parts. Gives me fits as I am so insecure about how I pronounce words... then to hear the locals version... ARG!

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    1. Sharon:
      We went for our now traditional birthday dinner at Sandpiper, so we could see Jessica. It IS funny that everyone has their own way of saying things but they don't understand ME when I don't pronounce it perfectly!

      Delete
  7. Reading through this, I did (as I am prone to do) move everything into French. Abrevaera becomes "abreuvoir" (same meaning: a drinking trough). But something interesting happens when you "drop" letters as you described. It becomes a-boir (à boire) which means "for drinking." So it works for me! Now, where's that corkscrew...

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    1. Walt the Fourth:
      As you'd expect, it's always easy to find a corkscrew around here.

      Delete
  8. Happy Birthday my dear friend, hope it was a great day and that a great deal of timeliness was yours, no matter how you say it!

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    1. Cranky:
      Another thing... You know those people who run naked across the field and football games? Streakers? Well, here they're called Streakers, too. Only that's pronounced eh-STREEK-ehr! Thanks and hugs.

      Delete
  9. Yes, H.B. (now for yesterday), Mitch. You're on my 'list' so I was looking for an oppo to post my wishes - and now that it's come, better now than not at all.
    And having hurriedly slid past pics of meat-heavy dishes, I only add that I hope you managed to do something special, and that D & M put on their best ingratiating behaviour to thank you for the care and hospitality you give them - and all for free.
    Hearty best wishes again.

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    1. Ray:
      Sorry about the meat pics. D&M make me feel loved and appreciated all the time. Thank you so much for the birthday wishes and for everything throughout the year. It's a pleasure to know you!

      Delete
  10. Happy birthday Mitch for yesterday. X

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    1. Rachel:
      Thanks so much. The celebration continues. Jerry calls it "birthday month."

      Delete
  11. Belated HBD, Mitchell. Abracadabra looks magical for sure! Hope you had a wonderful day. Cheers!

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    1. Wilma:
      I DID have a wonderful day. Thanks! Jerry even washed the breakfast and lunch dishes!

      Delete
  12. When I have made a few tries at learning Spanish, I am told to pick between "Latin" and "European" Spanish. You confirm for me they are different.

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