Friday, April 18, 2014

Four* Semana Santas

This is our fourth [*oops... only our third] Semana Santa (Holy Week) in Spain and our first time to experience a little bit of it in Málaga. We were spoiled in Sevilla — with our corner apartment and its seven balconies overlooking a historic plaza and an ancient street (click here for the last in the series of posts from our first Semana Santa... and for a view of the balconies). All I had to do was step outside or downstairs for our very personal view of several of the Semana Santa processions.

THE RED ON THE PAVEMENT IS NOT BLOOD.  IT'S WAX... I'M PRETTY SURE...
(CLICK ANY IMAGE.)

Here in Fuengirola, the processions are smaller and I actually have to walk "among the people." In Málaga, many of the processions are large and extravagant, but I'm required to share my space with thousands of others. So, I guess I'm jaded. I caught one very small procession of Málaga's 42 processions throughout the week. But I had a great time just wandering around the city taking pictures of the crowds and the preparations.

READY TO BE "PROCESSED" LATER IN THE DAY.
VERY CLASSY FOR A STORAGE UNIT.
CHEAP SEATS 3 HOURS BEFORE A SMALL PROCESSION ON CALLE CARRETERÍA..
THE EXPENSIVE VIP VIEWING AREA ON PLAZA DE LA CONSTITUCIÓN.
CALLE MARQUÉS DE LARIOS, THE PEDESTRIAN MALL. NO SHOPPING ON HOLY THURSDAY.
YOU CAN'T SEE THE PLAZA FOR THE TIERS.
SAN GERALDO... SMARTLY MAKING HIS ESCAPE.
FOUR HOURS BEFORE THE NEXT "SHOW TIME" ON CALLE MARQUÉS DE LARIOS.
THE CATHEDRAL OF MÁLAGA.
THE ADORNED BISHOP'S PALACE (CATHEDRAL FENCE AT RIGHT).
BUNTING EVERYWHERE.
FOUR HOURS BEFORE THE NEXT PROCESSION ALONG ALAMEDA PRINCIPAL.
I LOVE THE GERANIUM "GUARD RAIL" ON THIS BRIDGE (PUENTE DE TETUÁN).
THE BEST "PROCESSOR," WHILE I WAIT BACK ON CALLE CARRETERÍA.
RESERVED CHEAP (AS IN "FREE") SEATS.
AFTER SITTING COMFORTABLY ON A LEDGE FOR AN HOUR,
I CAN SEE AND HEAR THEM COMING.
BUT I DON'T THINK THEY'RE FROM FRANCE.
(CLICK HERE IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT I'M TALKING ABOUT.)
IT WAS DEFINITELY NOT A DANCING BEAT.
I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO SAY...
COLLECTING WAX.  (I WAS TEMPTED.)
HE LOOKS A BIT RUFF...
WALKING BAREFOOT TO ATONE FOR HIS SINS...
TWO EAR PIERCINGS, COOL WRIST BANDS, AND INCENSE...
A MOMENTARY BREAK.

AND BACK UP ON THEIR SHOULDERS.



PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING EVERY HOLY PROCESSION... BALLOONS.
STILL MORE THAN AN HOUR TO WAIT BACK ON ALAMEDA PRINCIPAL...  I WENT HOME.

24 comments:

  1. Oh man that was exhausting but informative......I can feel the somberness....Jerry I'm with you!!!

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    Replies
    1. Ron:
      And Jerry left before the crowds got bad. By evening, the city is unbearable to navigate.

      Delete
  2. San Geraldo had the right idea! But I really do appreciate the time and effort, and patience, you had to do this Mitchell. Incredible photos here. Thanks for sharing them.
    One would think that considering my background in this religion I would see the beauty in all this...it's been too long a time I guess. Yet again, maybe Europeans have a whole different view of these proceedings. History and tradition obviously mean a great deal to them.
    Have a wonderful weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim:
      I had a great time. It was unfortunate that the one procession I caught was such a small, understated one. Other pasos (floats) are enormous and unbelievably ornate. The traditions fascinate me, but I do have a challenging time with it all (including the incredible riches on display).

      Delete
  3. It's just spooky and amazing-- and breathtaking.

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  4. What incredible pictures. Thanks to you i feel like I'm experiencing the pageantry myself. Thanks so much.

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    Replies
    1. Stephen:
      Be sure to check out the photos from 2012 (go backwards from the link I provided). Thanks to YOU for your support.

      Delete
  5. Those black-hooded participants look so creepy - enough to scare the Bejeesus out of kids and some adults too - which, I think, was probably the original intention which still works. Now I wonder what they remind me of.......?

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    Replies
    1. Raybeard:
      You might remember that those hoods come in all colors (depending on the Brotherhood). My favorites (if you could call it that) were the purple hoods in Sevilla.

      Delete
  6. WOW! Another fine example of a religious fest we don't know in our northern regions.

    Just read and saw the photos about the Procession of Jesús del Gran poder in Quito, Ecuador where my friend Andrew lives. http://www.abritinecuador.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peter:
      Wow! That link you provided has amazing photos. I had been told about flagellants here today, but didn't see any. I don't know if that means they don't do it anymore (which would be nice) or if I just didn't see the "right" processions.

      I'll have to start following Andrew's blog. He's got some fascinating stories and photos. Thanks.

      Delete
  7. Quite fascinating. I wish I had began reading your blog much earlier, but I thank you for the links to the past. Now you have to mix it among the masses, rather than viewing them from above. I will now see the photos larger.

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    Replies
    1. Andrew:
      OK. I'm a member of the masses, but it sure was nice to view it all from our private perch.

      Delete
  8. Loving the pictures, as always, but the black pointy hats make me kinda uncomfortable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob:
      Well, if you don't like the hats in black, they also wear them in white, red, purple, blue... you name it (and they all still me uncomfortable).

      Delete
  9. wow, what a strange , custom. I haven't seen such processions in the Holy week. Thanks for photos.

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    1. Gosia:
      Especially common in Spanish-speaking countries. Italy has processions, too, but they're very different. Well, of course, there's the USA's Easter Parades. But those are all about the hats!

      Delete
  10. Ah, I see from the beginning sentence that you -like me- may have some challenges with numbers. But none at all with what is striking and colorful. I am another who really does not like those black costumes nor those pointy tall hats. No!

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    Replies
    1. Kristi:
      Four... Three... Oh well!

      Even more difficult for me are the hoods in white.

      Delete
  11. I remain fascinated by these things; I have a mixture of admiration, fear, and smiles at the camp element.

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  12. Purple hoods? Thank goodness you don't know where my mind is going on that one. Phew - what a relief that I can keep it to myself!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Raybeard:
      OK... I think I catch your drift. Red, pink, blue... and yellow, too.

      Delete

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