Saturday, April 12, 2014

The Last Córdoba Post ... This Month

This is it. I promise. I've got even more photos from our day in Córdoba, but I won't bore you with them all. Today, we start with lunch at Bodegas Mezquita on Calle Cespedes in the old Jewish Quarter, just across from the Mezquita/Cathedral. Exceptional food at good prices. Great service.

After lunch, we walked a bit. Until San Geraldo pooped out and I continued on my own.

San Geraldo says I dumped him. I like to think I parked him comfortably in an air-conditioned café. (Click the pics for a closer look at what San Geraldo saw and what he missed.)

DEEP-FRIED EGGPLANT WITH MOLASSES.
COD SALAD WITH ORANGES.
MEATBALLS "MOZARABE" — IN ALMOND SAUCE WITH SAFFRON.
"MOZARABE" REFERS TO THE CHRISTIANS OF MOORISH SPAIN;
(A NORTH AFRICAN STYLE OF COOKING).
 
UNLIKE AT RESTAURANTE CITRON IN MÁLAGA (CLICK HERE),
THE MEN'S ROOM WAS EASY TO IDENTIFY.
PEEKING INTO AN ENTRY COURTYARD OF A HOUSE WE PASSED
(BEFORE SAN GERALDO WAS DUMPED IN THAT CAFÉ).
ROMAN TEMPLE OF CÓRDOBA (CITY HALL AT LEFT).
CONSTRUCTION BEGAN DURING THE REIGN OF CLAUDIUS (41–54 A.D.).
DISCOVERED IN THE 1950s DURING THE EXPANSION OF CITY HALL.
FRAGMENTS OF THE TEMPLE.
OTHER REMAINS ARE HOUSED IN
CÓRDOBA'S ARCHAEOLOGY MUSEUM.
PLAZA DEL POTRO (COLT/FILLY). MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS IN BACKGROUND.

And that completes our tour.

I'm glad this is done. Now I can get back to telling embarrassing stories about San Geraldo.

23 comments:

  1. An amazing thing in Europe -- that I also experienced during my summers in Mexico -- is how urban construction projects keep finding the most amazing things from the past. My favorite Metro stop in Mexico City was one where they had uncovered a pre-Columbian pyramid and then had the sense to build the station around it, so that commuters walked by this wonderful artifact every day.

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    1. Michael:
      You can't dig anywhere, I think, in these old cities without finding historic treasures. I've never been to Mexico City. That would be amazing to see.

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  2. Mitchell! I for one, and suspect I am not alone in this, do not get bored with your 'guided tours'. I find them very informative and you 'tell the story' very well and get right to the point.
    Imagine finding those Roman ruins and rebuilding. I LOVE this stuff! As one of my majors in university was anthropology.
    I am sure you have few embarrassing tidbits for us on SG!

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    1. Thanks Jim and Judy! I really enjoy sharing my experiences here. Academic information is readily available. I like to make it more personal. I still haven't gotten deep into Málaga's history. Absolutely amazing architecture and right in my backyard. That's to come this year!

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  3. I'm loving your tours.... hope to come back someday and explore a lot more. But of course I'm looking forward to hearing more about the Saint as well ;-)

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    1. Sharon:
      Every city here is a revelation for me and I've hardly been anywhere yet.

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  4. I love secret little Spanish courtyards. They look like enticing little oasises.

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    1. Stephen:
      I've learned to never walk by an open door with peeking in. So many surprises. You think you're walking by an ordinary house only to discover a stunning garden behind the front door.

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  5. Wow!!!!!!! I had to save up your last three posts for today, when I had more time, and... WOWWOWOWOW! Thanks so, so much for these beautiful posts. I MUST see that cathedral in Córdoba some day. I look at a poster of it every single day, in my classroom (as I have for 11 years!), and then there it is, right there under your and San Geraldo's eyes (wait... he didn't miss the cathedral, right??). Woo hoo!

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    1. Judy:
      You have to explore these places. You would love it. San Geraldo walked the mezquita/cathedral for 2 hours (we did the audio tour). Then, he walked another hour around the city. He only missed my after-lunch walk.

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  6. It seems me the food was very deliciuos.

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    1. Gosia:
      The food was exceptional. A great restaurant choice.

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  7. The egg-plants, which we call aubergines, look 'Mmmmmmmm'. I suppose the molasses is SWEET? (Is there any other kind?) Would most certainly give 'em a go.

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    1. Raybeard:
      Yes, aubergines and treacle. Very popular here, but we've only had thinly sliced aubergines served in this dish. The presentation was unusual and the aubergines were fat. They were battered and made to look like jumbo shrimp (with a portion of the aubergine sticking out one end like a shrimp's tail). These were the best we've had.

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  8. It is hard to come to terms with how old some things are in Europe, as you would probably understand coming from the US. Anyway, the food in your post looks appetising.

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    1. Andrew:
      Having lived in New England, we were familiar with "old." Our town of Guilford was settled in 1639 and there were still homes from that time and through the centuries. But 1639 here is modern times!

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  9. Pobre San Geraldo!
    He missed some spectacular vistas!

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    1. Bob:
      Pobresito. But he also missed being "pollenated" (the earlier blog post).

      Delete
  10. What a beautiful tour. It is unlikely that I will ever have a chance to see Cordoba in person, so I really appreciate your wonderful photo tours of this beautiful place. I especially enjoyed the courtyard garden!

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    1. Kristi:
      I'll start getting shots of other courtyard gardens and will do a post just on those. A very common sight in Southern Spain.

      Delete
  11. That cod salad looks delish!!
    Nice scenery all around, I see...
    :)

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    Replies
    1. TICKLEBEAR:
      The cod salad WAS delish. I've never had one quite like it.

      Delete

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