Thursday, January 26, 2017

Caterpillar To Butterfly

The four stages of a butterfly: Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis, Butterfly.

(Click the images for a butterfly's eye view.)

In nature a repulsive caterpillar turns into
a lovely butterfly.
But with humans it is the other way around:
A lovely butterfly turns into a repulsive caterpillar.
                                              — Anton Chekhov

ENTRANCE TO THE BUTTERFLY PARK (MARIPOSARIO), BENALMÁDENA.
CATERPILLARS AND EGGS (RIGHT)
DOCENT MARINA HOLDING A CHRYSALIS.
(NOTE THE BUTTERFLY WING SHOWING THROUGH THE SURFACE).
ADORNED (BY NATURE) WITH GOLD BEADING.
IT WOULD MAKE A GREAT PENDANT.
IT DARKENS WHEN THE BUTTERFLY IS CLOSE TO EMERGING.
A DIFFERENT TYPE OF BUTTERFLY. 
ON ITS MAIDEN VOYAGE, THIS YOUNG BUTTERFLY
DECIDED TO IMMEDIATELY REST AND DRY OFF ON JUDY'S HEAD.
THEY WERE INSEPARABLE FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES.

18 comments:

  1. That entrance looks like buildings I saw in Thailand. Butterflies always make me happy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stephen:
      The building is a surprise to see here in Andalucía, but it's across the street from the Buddhist temple. Butterflies make me happy, too.

      Delete
  2. When you want to leave but can't because a baby butterfly claimed your hair as its new home....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheapchick:
      We really did talk about getting help from Marina in case Judy's new friend tried to ride outside with her.

      Delete
  3. Lucky Judy! That would be a wonderful experience.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cat Lover:
      I thought so too. But they never land on me. I need to wear yellow or red. My hair, when I had it, was never an attraction (it was black). Now that it's nonexistent, there's nothing to latch onto.

      Delete
  4. WOW! Nature is SO incredible!
    And lucky Judy! I bet they bonded!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Replies
    1. Wilma:
      I would have stayed another hour, but we were hungry! A great place.

      Delete
  6. When my kids were little we used to look for caterpillars (monarchs) and put them in a cage, feeding them milkweed... they'd form a chrysilas and finally emerge into the world and we'd turn them loose. Years later, Bill & I visited the place in Mexico where the monarchs spend their winters. They are losing their natural habitat here in Mexico... it would be so sad if they die out like so many other critters who no longer have their natural place to live.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sharon:
      When we lived in Santa Barbara, the Monarchs used to migrate through our area and spend time in the Eucalyptus grove near our house. We would walk over and feel the magic.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Walt the Fourth:
      I love this place and don't go nearly enough.

      Delete
  8. What a beautiful post. The butterfly transition has also fascinated me. How long are they in the cocoon do you know? Here is Philly I periodically go to the Museum of Natural History, where they now have a huge butterfly garden. It's pretty cool. Just have to make sure one doesn't have a few stranglers on you when you emerge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mistress Maddie:
      It varies. The Monarch, for example, in summer is an egg for maybe 5 to 10 days, caterpillar 10 to 14 days, chrysalis 10 to 14 days. Marina told us about a giant moth that is in the cocoon for more than 4 weeks and only lives a couple of days (it doesn't eat or drink and just lives to procreate).

      Delete

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