Saturday, January 6, 2018

Inside The Pomegranate / Dentro De Granada

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

THE MOORISH RULERS of the Iberian Peninsula were amazingly advanced in architecture, science, construction, and the arts. Our guide Federico pointed out how modern artists and architects were strongly influenced by Granada's 14th-century Alhambra. Dutch artist M.C. Escher first visited in 1922 and said he was fascinated by the "regular division of the plane." He went on to make it his passion. I've always found Spanish architect Antoni Gaudi's work incredible but never appreciated how much he, too, was influenced by the Alhambra and Moorish architecture.

Also surprising was how colorful the interiors would have been. The windows were stained glass (one skylight remains). The plaster walls were smothered in color and some color remains to this day. Floors were festooned with rugs. It's hard to imagine the flamboyance until you see hints of it from the faded colors that survived.

A public service announcement (I am not being paid to tell you): If you need a a travel agent and/or tour guide here in Spain, contact Federico. I usually hate guided tours. I loved this one. Click here to visit Granada Exclusive.

LOS GOBERNANTES ÁRABES de la Península Ibérica fueron increíblemente avanzados en arquitectura, ciencia, ingeniería, y arte. Nuestro guía Federico señaló cómo los artistas y arquitectos modernos fueron fuertemente influenciados por la Alhambra de Granada del siglo XIV. Artista holandés M.C. Escher visitó por primera vez en 1922 y dijo que estaba fascinado por la "división regular de un plano". Continuó haciéndolo su pasión. Siempre me pareció increíble la obra del arquitecto español Antoni Gaudí, pero nunca me di cuenta de lo mucho que también estaba influenciado por la arquitectura árabe y de la Alhambra.

También me sorprendió lo coloridos que habrían sido los interiores. Las ventanas eran vidrieras (queda una claraboya). Las paredes de yeso estaban cubiertas de color y aún queda algo de color. Los pisos estaban adornados con alfombras. Es difícil imaginar la extravagancia hasta que veas indicios de los colores desvaídos que sobrevivieron.




ALHAMBRA BONES.
HUESOS DE LA ALHALMBRA.



LIZARD BY M.C. ESCHER, 1942.
LAGARTIJA DE M.C. ESCHER, 1942.

ANTONIN GAUDI'S TEMPLE OF THE SAGRADA FAMILIA IN BARCELONA. BEGUN, 1882.
TEMPLO DE LA SAGRADA FAMLIA, ANTONIN GAUDI. COMENZADO, 1882.
THANKS TO FEDERICO FOR THIS PHOTO (BETTER THAN MINE) FROM THE ALHAMBRA.
GRACIAS A FEDERICO POR ESTA FOTO (MEJOR QUE EL MIO) DE LA ALHAMBRA.

20 comments:

  1. I would absolutely LOVE to visit Spain. How beautiful everything is.

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    Replies
    1. Jennifer:
      Well, everything I show is beautiful. I don't share the ugly. However, there is an awful lot of beautiful. I love it here.

      Delete
  2. I never knew that Escher was influenced by the Alhambra, but seeing your photos -- of course! It makes so much sense! I'd love to see the Alhambra some day. My Rare One saw it several decades ago when she was young and wild and roaming around Europe.

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    Replies
    1. Debra:
      It was news to me, as well bu t, yes, it became obvious once it was pointed out. I have heard about the Alhambra forever and many people have said Granada is their favorite city in Spain. Looking forward to getting back there.

      Delete
  3. One day when we go back to Spain (not an if but a when) I would like to visit the Alhambra. I really loved the bits of Andalusia we saw

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    Replies
    1. Cheapchick:
      The Alhambra is certainly a highlight of Andalucía. Amazing.

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. Bob:
      I also love the tiles. The variety and designs are amazing. But I am overwhelmed by Moorish plasterwork... and imagining it all hand-painted.

      Delete
  5. So THAT'S what influenced Escher! And here all this time I thought he was dropping acid.

    All kidding aside, I wonder if Keith Haring also visited Granada.

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    Replies
    1. Kirk:
      I think it was Escher who said, "I don't use drugs, my dreams are frightening enough." I hadn't thought about Keith Haring, but you're right to wonder!

      Delete
  6. The work, detail and patterns!! Stunning work!

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    Replies
    1. Jim:
      So worth another visit... and another...

      Delete
  7. Incredible photos, I can't imagine how fantastic it must have been in person.

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    1. Wilma:
      It was as impressive and exciting as I was told it would be. Wish I could see it without all those other people there! I can't imagine what it must have been like in living color with all the stained glass, wall colors, rugs, and draperies.

      Delete
  8. I don't think a lot of people realize how Muslims were doing science when Europeans were fighting over religion

    now it's the other way around

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    Replies
    1. Adam:
      Their accomplishments were phenomenal and their societies were often more inclusive. But they were sadly not as inclusive as we sometimes read. Still... it was better in many ways than what followed after the reconquest.

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. anne marie:
      I'd been reading and hearing for years how amazing the Alhambra is. All true. And definitely worth the expense of a private guide for your own small group. What an experience. Next, the city of Granada, which is supposed to be amazing, too.

      Delete
  10. Granada is indeed a magical place. We visited the Alhambra at night and then again the next day. I used as my guide book Washington Irving's 1829 book Tales of the Alhambra. I wrote a length about it here: https://willyorwonthe.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/a-guide-from-the-past/

    Your photos turned out so much better than mine. And as always that food - especially the desert - looks fabulous.

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    Replies
    1. Willym:
      Oh, a night visit would amazing and I do want to read Washington Irving's book. Federico mentioned him often. I promise to check out your post from 2014 as soon as I get caught up. I am SO far behind on everything! Thanks for the link!

      Delete

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